‘Is Islam also a religion from God?’

This came up in discussion not long ago.

Premise 1: If I believed Islam was a religion from God, I would be Muslim.
Premise 2: I’m not Muslim.
_______________
Conclusion: Therefore, I don’t believe Islam is a religion from God.

Islam and Christianity cannot both be right. Any Christian who says Islam is a message is mistaken about Islam or Christianity. The two religions teach opposite different things about:

  • God
  • Jesus
  • the Crucifixion and Resurrection
  • And so on.

The teachings cannot be reconciled. To try, you must distort the teachings of both.

As to how and why? Maybe I’ll elaborate on these another time.

Lack of Knowledge of Christianity

Despite this blog, many people whom I see in daily life are not religious. Most people don’t think that I’m a believer. It surprises them when they find out I am. I don’t know why.

The wording may not be exactly correct, nor the order I asked stuff, but this event occurred.

I was speaking to someone — a non-believer — a few days ago. For some reason, the topic of religion cropped up. His lack of knowledge of Christianity was astounding.

He told me how Jesus was a myth because they did not find his bones in his tomb.

I pointed out, further, that the body wouldn’t stay in the cave. People collected the bones of the deceased after a year. They would usually put them in a famliy ossuary. If not, they bury the body. He didn’t know what an ossuary was, so I explained that. It baffled him, but oh well.

I told him that, in Christianity, Christ rose from the dead. He stared at me in utter confusion. Then said he had never heard that.
Then, he said that he believed that twelve people made up Jesus: the disciples.

When I asked why he thinks that? They thought it would be funny.

I asked if he knew that, save one, all the disciples died horrible deaths. As did Paul. People killed them in violent ways for their message.
Why would they do that? Why would they not recant their message? If “twelve people” made up Christ, why would they die for it?

Why would the Bible record them the way it did? It has them doing unflattering things. It records them as weak, cowards, lazy and incompetent.
Often, they are unable to understand Christ. Why would they make up someone so much better and make themselves look like fools?
Why would none of them admit they made it up? Why would they die for something they knew was a lie?

People die for what they believe. People will kill and die for a religious belief. People will not die for something they know didn’t happen. They will not suffer for it.

And, out of twelve people, none of them recanted? None of them admitted it was a lie? None of them slipped up? When crucified, about to have their heads removed or skinned alive? None confessed to making it up?

He stared at me for a moment. Trying to think of something to say. ‘I don’t believe any of it anyway.’ He said, after a moment of silence.

‘But they did. And they died proclaiming what they had seen. They received nothing for it. No money. Just ridicule and death.’ I responded.
He changed the topic to what he was having for dinner that day.

Now, this is a cringeworthy discussion at the best of times. The real kicker?

He went to a Catholic school.

Meekness vs obsequiousness

Obsequiousness isn’t meekness. Meekness isn’t obsequiousness.

The vices opposed to humility are,

  1. pride: by reason of defect, and
  2. a too great obsequiousness or abjection of oneself, which would be an excess of humility. This might easily be derogatory to a man’s office or holy character; or it might serve only to pamper pride in others, by unworthy flattery, which would occasion their sins of tyranny, arbitrariness, and arrogance.

The virtue of humility may not be practised in any external way which would occasion such vices or acts in others.

Source: New Advent: Catholic Encyclopedia: Humility. Last accessed 21 March 17.

Meekness isn’t letting people walk all over you, as shown in another blog post (Meek in Greek).

Sometimes you have to be strong. Stand tall, defiant. Until we begin to rediscover what humility actually is, we’re going to be in for a lot of headaches. We’re called to be just, not necessarily nice.

Blessed Easter

This is an Easter for the West and the East.

Christ is risen! Truly, He is risen!

ܡܫܝܚܐ ܩܡ! ܫܪܝܪܐܝܬ ܩܡ!

המשיח קם! באמת קם!

 

Χριστὸς ἀνέστη! Ἀληθῶς ἀνέστη!

Христос воскрес! Воистину воскрес!

 

Christus resurrexit! Resurrexit vere!

 

Χριστὸς ἀνέστη ἐκ νεκρῶν,
θανάτῳ θάνατον πατήσας,
καὶ τοῖς ἐν τοῖς μνήμασι,
ζωὴν χαρισάμενος!

Christ is risen from the dead,
Trampling down death by death,
And upon those in the tombs
Bestowing life!

 

 

Crucem sanctam subiit,
qui infernum confregit,
accinctus est potentia,
surrexit die tertia. Alleluia.

Lapidem quem reprobaverunt
aedeficantes factus est
caput anguli, alleluia.

Translation:

He bore the Holy Cross,
who broke the power of hell;
He was girded with power
He rose again the third day, alleluia

The stone that the architects rejected
became the cornerstone, alleluia.

On this day we celebrate:

  • Life conquering death
  • Truth over falsehood
  • Knowledge over deceit
  • Good over wickedness

 

Have a blessed Easter, everyone.

An anti-Christian Genetic Fallacy

“Christianity is a Jewish religion. Europeans and [European] Americans shouldn’t follow it.”
I see this a lot online. I’ve heard it offline from a few Neopagan types.
I don’t understand why. This isn’t an argument. This is a a genetic fallacy.
A genetic fallacy is where you dismiss something on the grounds of where it’s from.
I suppose you can also say it’s the “Not Invented Here”.
Yes, Christianity started outside Europe. Regardless, it has been a part of European (and, by extension, America)’s heart for about a thousand years. Some places more, some less.
It has built Europe and American civilization as we know it. It has been an integral part of it.
Even then, this means little.
Whether this is true holds no relevance. Is it true or not? That is the ultimate question.
Ignoring something because of its origins is not wise. The number system used in the West is not European. Should we remove that? What about units of time?
Truth is truth, regardless of its origins.
1+1=2 in India, Africa, Europe, or America.

“Why Returning To The Pagan Mindset Could Bring Back Masculinity” – A quick reflection

I read an article from  the site”Return of Kings”, today which interested me. Its title was: Why Returning To The Pagan Mindset Could Bring Back Masculinity [link].

I must admit, I laughed at the title before I read it. I thought it was going to be hyper-masculine, neopagan LARPing. It wasn’t.
The author states that modern Christianity has a reputation for being namby-pamby. This is correct. It does. This namby-pamby, weak Christianity is what inspired me to set up this blog.
This weakness turns away many people. I can understand why. I come from a tough, working-class area. The Christianity many seem to espouse cannot work here.
 
Despite this, it’s not Christianity at its heart. It’s a modernist, idealistic sense of Christianity. It doesn’t work. It can’t. This new form believes everyone is good, that we can overcome with dialogue. Despite we can’t always do that.
Michael Sebastian, the author of the article, states:
Medieval Christianity did not share the modern belief that everyone is good. Cities were built with walls and strong defenses, not because their inhabitants hated the people on the outside, but because they wanted to protect themselves and their posterity. The idea that Christians are obligated to take in hordes of Muslim immigrants would have been ridiculed by Christians of the past.
I agree. Actually, I imagine it would be more than that. More likely, they would see those who think that as traitors. An enemy within.
He states how modern Christianity is pacifistic. Many Church leaders and Christians espouse not only non-violence, but even avoiding self-defence. He’s right. I’ve discussed with some Christians who act like that. Their smugness grates me.
 
I imagine that he, like me, is unhappy to be able to say this and be right. This lilly-livered pseudo-Christianity makes me sick. This is usually a form of idealism found in middle-class neighbourhoods. Very little crime. Everyone knows each other. A world a far cry from the world outside my living room.
 
The author and I part ways in agreement with the term ‘pagan mindset’. He doesn’t advocate for rejoining the old, European pagan religions. It would’ve been better if he used something else. Like Crusader Mindset. Or Templar Mindset. But Pagan mindset? Nah.
This is anecdotal, but most pagans I meet are serious SJWs or LARPers. They seem to hate Christians. Many even seem to love Islam. Weird, I know, but this is my experience – and it’s not one or two people.
 
His conclusion? A hope for church leaders to stop chasing secular culture. To reclaim our medieval history.
 
I agree. I am not ashamed of the Crusades* nor the Reconquista. If it wasn’t for those, Europe would have been Islamic. Islam doesn’t absorb cultures. It doesn’t meld with them. It destroys and replaces them. Overrides them. In rare cases, Islam and another culture can co-exist, but this seems to be more rural. Cities become more… Arabesque? The culture doesn’t survive as much.
 
* Except the Fourth. What the hell was that about?
My stance is, if we want to help destroy the SJW, pseudo-Christianity, we have to do three things:
  • be vocal
  • live it
  • encourage it
 
I encourage my Christian traditionalist friends and any traditionalist, Christian readers to write. Blog. Speak. Proclaim. Preach. Grow. Read. Learn apologetics. Defend.
The brave form of Christianity, the one of our ancestors, will take off.
We can do it.

Prayer is Transformative

The concept of prayer popped up in discussion recently.
They asked: “what is the point in praying, if God knows the future?”.
 
Now, that is definitely an interesting question. Also, though, it’s the wrong one.
 
Prayer isn’t always about asking God for things. God is not some cosmic sugar daddy who gives you everything. Christianity isn’t Cosmic Ordering: the Religion.
 
Prayer is transformative. It changes you. It allows you to grow. It’s not about getting what you want. It lets you recognise what you want. It doesn’t mean you’re always going to get it.
 
Prayer helps you. It builds you. It’s not weak. It’s not an act of cowardice. Submitting yourself to He Who is Greater? That requires a lot of courage. I see it as a workout for the soul.